Category Archives: Transparency for Development

Delivering Results Through Adaptive Learning

Rapid prototyping and failing fast are not just Silicon Valley buzzwords – the Transparency for Development team shares how these concepts can lead to better designed interventions. This blog post is the third in a series highlighting key lessons from the new paper — Citizen Voices, Community Solutions: Designing Better Transparency and Accountability Approaches to Improve Health — from the Transparency for Development Project. This post was originally published by Results for DevelopmentRead other posts from the project here

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

Searching for Understanding about Transparency and Accountability Interventions: The RCT Stage

T4D Open Meeting in Malawi. Photo credit: Kelvin Chirwa

This post shares 6 core principles for guiding the design of a transparency and accountability intervention to improve public services across a wide variety of contexts. This blog post is the second in a series highlighting key lessons from the new paper — Citizen Voices, Community Solutions: Designing Better Transparency and Accountability Approaches to Improve Health — from the Transparency for Development Project. Read other posts from the project here

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

How to Design Community Scorecards to Improve Health

 

Can community scorecards be used to improve global health and education outcomes? The evidence is mixed, so the Transparency for Development team shares some tips on how to improve scorecard design. This blog post is the first in a series highlighting key lessons from the new paper — Citizen Voices, Community Solutions: Designing Better Transparency and Accountability Approaches to Improve Health — from the Transparency for Development Project

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Participation, Transparency for Development

Stories and Statistics: How communities can improve health workers’ bedside manners

© Transparency for Development/Jessica Creighton

In this post Senior Program Associate at Results for Development Preston Whitt shares the surprising ways communities in Indonesia and Tanzania are addressing the deep discontent within communities regarding health provider behavior and attitudes. This is the third post in the “Stories and Stats” blog series, which shares exciting quantitative trends from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Project, and digs into the stories behind the numbers. Read more from the T4D Project here. This post was originally published on the Results for Development blog.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

Stories and Statistics: How Citizens Demand Accountability for Healthcare

This post explores the surprising ways 100 Indonesian communities are holding their government officials and healthcare providers accountable. This is the second post in the “Stories and Stats” blog series, which shares exciting quantitative trends from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Project, and digs into the stories behind the numbers. Read more from the T4D Project here. This post was originally published on the Results for Development blog.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

Stories and Statistics: How Qualitative Methods Help us Read Between the Numbers

This is the first post in the “Stories and Stats” blog series, which will share some exciting quantitative trends from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Project, and will dig into the stories behind the numbers. This post shares stories from T4D communities in Indonesia that demonstrate the importance of leaving room for local knowledge and creativity in international development projects. Read more from the T4D Project here. This post was originally published on the Results for Development blog.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

Action, Persistence, Sustainability: One T4D Community’s Effort to Improve MNH

T4DThis blog post is the fifth in the Transparency for Development series “T4D: Views from the Field,” written to highlight what members of the T4D team have observed in launching a co-designed intervention in Tanzania and Indonesia that seeks to empower citizens to improve maternal and newborn health in their communities.

In an earlier post in the series, Lindsey Roots took us inside a Community Scorecard Meeting in one Tanzanian village. In this post, Jessica Creighton depicts a Follow-up Meeting, this time in a village in Indonesia. 

Read other posts from the T4D project here

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Participation, Transparency for Development

Teachers or Facilitators?: How T4D Facilitators Shape Our Intervention

T4DThis blog post is the fourth in the Transparency for Development series “T4D: Views from the Field,” written to highlight what members of the T4D team have observed in launching a co-designed intervention in Tanzania and Indonesia that seeks to empower citizens to improve maternal and newborn health in their communities.

This post is written by ethnographer Megan Cogburn with support from fellow ethnographer Mohamed Yunus Rafiq, focusing on one of the factors that she observed during her time living in and researching villages in which the intervention took place in Tanzania. 

It is an example of the insights that can emerge from the ethnographic approach that is a core component of our research—insights that can reveal potentially key factors that neither the practitioners nor the researchers on the team would have thought in advance to explore.  These kinds of insights will be incorporated into our later research, forming the basis for hypotheses that we can explore more widely and systematically to understand why the intervention played out differently across communities.

Read other posts from the T4D project here

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

One Village’s Journey to Better Maternal and Newborn Health

T4DThis blog post is the third in the Transparency for Development series “T4D: Views from the Field,” written to highlight what members of the T4D team have observed in launching a co-designed intervention in Tanzania and Indonesia that seeks to empower citizens to improve maternal and newborn health in their communities. 

The previous two posts explored problem-driven design and the importance of people in the T4D intervention. In this post, Lindsey Roots takes us inside a Community Scorecard Meeting in one Tanzanian village. She observes how meetings are facilitated to prompt community members to reflect on their own experiences with Maternal and Newborn Health (MNH), and to empower them to identify barriers and solutions to better MNH.

Read other posts from the T4D project here.
Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

Power from the People: Who Matters in a Social Accountability Intervention?

T4DThis blog post is the second in the Transparency for Development series “T4D: Views from the Field,” written to highlight what members of the T4D team have observed in launching a co-designed intervention in Tanzania and Indonesia that seeks to empower citizens to improve maternal and newborn health in their communities. 

In this post, Courtney Tolmie shares take aways from observing the intervention in five villages in Indonesia earlier this year, focusing on the importance of intentionally designing the roles of the civil society organization, the facilitator, the community representatives, and the government in a social accountability intervention. 

Read other posts from the T4D project here.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

Problem-driven Design: Zooming in for a Ten Millimeter View

T4DThis blog post is the first in a new Transparency for Development series “T4D: Views from the Field,” written to highlight what members of the T4D team have observed in launching a co-designed intervention in Tanzania and Indonesia that seeks to empower citizens to improve maternal and newborn health in their communities. 

In the first post from this series, Courtney Tolmie shares take aways from observing the intervention in five villages in Indonesia earlier this year, focusing on problem-driven design and what this theoretical approach looks like on the ground for T4D.

Read other posts from the T4D project here.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Transparency for Development

The Surprising Power of Stories for Accountability: From Testable Theories to Motivating Tales

22737545512_d985f95933_q (1)Today’s post from Courtney Tolmie is the fourth in an occasional series, cross-posted on the Results for Development blog, that shares insights from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Initiative. The T4D Initiative—a joint effort of the Ash Center and Results for Development—is about empowering people, improving maternal and newborn health, and learning. It was developed to answer questions about what determines whether an intervention can increase citizen empowerment while improving health outcomes at the same time. Although the project is ongoing and final results are a long way off, T4D is excited to share initial take-aways about the importance of local context, community involvement, mixed methods evaluations, co-design, and piloting.

Courtney Tolmie is Program Director at Results for Development, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unlock solutions to tough development challenges that prevent people in low- and middle-income countries from realizing their full potential. She is a principal investigator on the T4D Initiative alongside Archon Fung, who serves as Chief of Party. In this post, Tolmie shares T4D’s experience using Social Action Stories to empower people to improve their community health service delivery by determining and undertaking collaborative actions.

Read the other posts in this series here.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Democracy in Hard Places, Innovation, Participation, Transparency for Development

Does the World Need Another Toolkit? 4 Ways to Use Transparency, Accountability, and Health Resources from the T4D Project

22737545512_d985f95933_q (1)Today’s post from Courtney Tolmie is the third in an occasional series, cross-posted on the Results for Development blog, that shares insights from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Initiative. The T4D Initiative—a joint effort of the Ash Center and Results for Development—is about empowering people, improving maternal and newborn health, and learning. It was developed to answer questions about what determines whether an intervention can increase citizen empowerment while improving health outcomes at the same time. Although the project is ongoing and final results are a long way off, T4D is excited to share initial take-aways about the importance of local context, community involvement, mixed methods evaluations, co-design, and piloting.

Courtney Tolmie is Program Director at Results for Development, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unlock solutions to tough development challenges that prevent people in low- and middle-income countries from realizing their full potential. She is a principal investigator on the T4D Initiative alongside Archon Fung, who serves as Chief of Party. In this post, Tolmie shares four ways practitioners can use the transparency, accountability, and health resources developed during the T4D project in a broad range of initiatives.

Read the other posts in this series here.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Democracy in Hard Places, Innovation, Participation, Transparency for Development

Failing Fast: 3 Things We Have Learned about Engaging and Empowering Communities

22737545512_d985f95933_q (1)Today’s post from Courtney Tolmie is the second in an occasional series, cross-posted on the Results for Development blog, that shares insights from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Initiative. The T4D Initiative—a joint effort of the Ash Center and Results for Development—is about empowering people, improving maternal and newborn health, and learning. It was developed to answer questions about what determines whether an intervention can increase citizen empowerment while improving health outcomes at the same time. Although the project is ongoing and final results are a long way off, T4D is excited to share initial take-aways about the importance of local context, community involvement, mixed methods evaluations, co-design, and piloting.

Courtney Tolmie is Program Director at Results for Development, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unlock solutions to tough development challenges that prevent people in low- and middle-income countries from realizing their full potential. She is a principal investigator on the T4D Initiative alongside Archon Fung, who serves as Chief of Party. In this post, Tolmie shares three lessons about the importance of piloting and iterative learning before launching a large intervention.

Read other posts in this series here.

Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under Democracy in Hard Places, Innovation, Participation, Transparency for Development

How to Empower People and Save Babies: 5 Things That Might Work (And 5 That Definitely Won’t)

22737545512_d985f95933_q (1)Today’s post from Courtney Tolmie is the first in an occasional series, cross-posted on the Results for Development blog, that will share insights from the Transparency for Development (T4D) Initiative. The T4D Initiative—a joint effort of the Ash Center and Results for Development—is about empowering people, improving health, and learning. It was developed to answer questions about what determines whether an intervention will be successful in increasing citizen empowerment and improving health outcomes. Although the project is ongoing and final results are a long way off, T4D is an exciting initiative that takes an innovative approach to local context, community involvement, mixed methods evaluations, co-design, and piloting.

Tolmie is Program Director at Results for Development, a non-profit organization whose mission is to unlock solutions to tough development challenges that prevent people in low- and middle-income countries from realizing their full potential. She is a principal investigator on the T4D Initiative alongside Archon Fung, who serves as Chief of Party. In this post, Tolmie introduces the initiative and shares some of the T4D team’s early learning and takeaways in the form of five lessons about transparency and accountability intervention design.

Read other posts in this series here.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Democracy in Hard Places, Innovation, Participation, Transparency for Development